Redress Agreement

In the post-war years, Japanese Canadians established the Committee for Democracy between Japan and Canada, which later became the National Association of Japanese Canadians (NAJC). In 1977, during the centenary celebrations of the arrival of the first Japanese immigrant to Canada, discussions on reparations began to bear fruit. At a meeting in cellars and cafes, Japanese anger resumed and the sense of shame was gradually replaced by a sense of indignation. [37] This encouraged Japanese Canadians to fight for their rights and obtain compensation for their experiences during the war. The apology and reparations that Japanese Canadians received 25 years ago this week for what they suffered during World War II paved the way for similar settlements for other cultural groups, says a former Leader of the Japanese-Canadian community. However, the former students of the day say they were excluded from the settlement contract because they were not obliged to live in schools. In August 1988, following extensive discussions, a compensation agreement was reached between the NAJC and the federal government. On September 22, 1988, Brian Mulroney, then Prime Minister, issued a formal apology to all Japanese Canadians in the House of Commons. In addition to the apology, the government offered $21,000 to those directly affected by internment, the creation of a community fund, pardons for those who were unjustly imprisoned during the war, and Canadian citizenship for Canadians and their descendants who had been unfairly deported to Japan at the end of the war.

Last but not least, the agreement promised $24 million for the creation of the current Canadian Race Relations Foundation, which aims to promote the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination in Canada. He also signed a reparation agreement that provided US$21,000 to each surviving internee, $12 million to a Japanese community fund and $24 million to establish a Canadian Foundation for Race Relations. For Lena Hayakawa, it is important for Canadians to hear tragic stories about the internment of Japanese Canadians. She knows that it is easier for her to disappear from history if we do not talk about human rights violations. If an injury from our past is erased, it becomes easier to deny others. It is everyone`s duty to express themselves. She explained how repair helped her and many others open up to her experience so that future generations could understand exactly what happened here in Canada. The Canadian government opened negotiations in the mid-1980s. In 1984, a symbolic group bill of $6 million was offered.

Some Japanese and Canadians initially wanted to accept it because it seemed politically realistic and was afraid to ask for more. However, the NJAC felt that the acceptance of this offer maintained the war attitude meant that the Japanese and Canadians could be considered weak and wanted negotiated (unsealed) regulation and recognition that both individual group and human rights had been abused. An agreement was reached on 22 September 1988. « When the appeal came… We started dating all our stories so people would know what happened to us. Our children will know what happened. Otherwise, they`ll never know. Although she was shy, Hayakawa engaged in the struggle for reparation and told her family`s story at public meetings and events. « When [the NAJC] had a meeting, they asked me if I was going to make a little speech, and I said, « Oh, I`m not very good at speech, » but I did my best and I did it.

I am sure there will be a general consensus that Canadians do not want to fundamentally change the nature of our population because of mass immigration.

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